New Teaching Assistants at the German Department

Hey there!

We are Ben and Martin, the new teaching assistants for German at Aston University and would like to introduce ourselves to everyone.

I`m Ben, 23, from a small town in the Ruhr Area. I am studying for a Bachelor of Education with the subjects German, Maths and English for primary school teaching and I am about to finish my degree. I like reading, sports (ice hockey, football, darts) and hiking. I am looking forward to travelling GB, getting to know new people and learning about British culture.

I`m Martin, I am 21 years old and I come from Paderborn. I’m in my fifth semester, with the subjects English and History in order to become a teacher. I am a huge sports fan and try to stay fit by doing sports myself. Moreover I like reading and travelling around. I hope to learn as much as possible about the English language and culture during my time here at Aston!

We will be giving oral and aural skills sessions and drop-in clinics (Mo 10-12, Fr 9-11) at Aston University and are looking forward to meeting all of you there. So if you have any questions regarding grammar, your homework or if you are just interested in having a conversation in German, please come see us in N807.

 

We look forward to seeing you all,

Ben and Martin

Andreas Spechtl and Uwe Schütte in Wuppertal this Friday

Our colleague and pop music expert Uwe Schütte will discuss the very German topic of “Utopie Heimat” with Ja, Panik singer Andreas Spechtl this Friday. The event is part of the Wuppertaler Literatur Biennale literary festival.

550x475.pm1.bgFFFFFFAndreas was Aston 2015 DAAD Songwriter in Residence and has recently released his much acclaimed solo album SLEEP. With Uwe, he will talk about his song lyrics and the role of pop music in a neoliberal world where there is increasingly no Heimat left…..

For more info check out this blog post from the leading pop music magazine SPEX.

You can watch Andi playing “Nevermind” here

 

Aston German graduate among 30 Ones to Watch 2016

Karina Burrowes, who graduated from Aston University with a BSc in German in 2011, has been selected as one of 30 Ones to Watch 2016 by Brummel Magazine. In their fourth annual Ones to Watch list, they celebrate “the breadth, performance and achievement of bright young talent in London’s financial services sector and allied fields”. Nominees are required to be under 40 years of age and an outperformer in their market and, beyond that, need to demonstrate drive, energy and an entrepreneurial spirit. Additionally, the judges looked for evidence of a nominee’s holistic contribution to the organisation, whether internally, as a leader of a networking or advocacy group, or externally, as a champion of a charity, mentoring programme or other such project.

Karina joined the Bloomberg graduate scheme in 2011 and currently holds the position of EMEA technical support manager.

Here’s what Brummel has to say about her:

Burrowes joined Bloomberg as a graduate in 2011 and has progressed from individual contributor to leader, then manager in less than five years.
A co-leader of the Bloomberg Women’s Community, Burrowes has a strong interest in gender diversity and is an advocate for a number of women in the technical-support department. She has organised events on topics linked to diversity and inclusion, from panel discussions to a workshop for leaders on male advocacy, which explored ways of tackling workplace gender issues.

Karina, congratulations from the German staff at Aston and all the best for your future endeavors!

Manner-wafers and Halloren-chocolate coming to Britain?

Last weekend more than 40 students arrived at Aston University to attend international marketing workshops given by Aston staff. Pupils from all over the country came to Birmingham and experienced a weekend full of fun and information. On Saturday morning, the weekend began with a Welcome session after which the students went into different groups depending on their language.

Five pupils joined our German workshop and did not only learn a lot about marketing and its different areas but of course got the chance to improve their language skills as the workshop was held in German. Different marketing theories such as “The four P’s” or “AIDA” were explained to give them an idea of what marketing is about.

On Sunday, the students then had to put their knowledge together by designing marketing strategies for different Austrian and German products such as Manner-wafers and Halloren chocolate bubbles. They prepared their presentations as well as TV advertisements. At the end of the day each group presented their project in front of the group as if presenting their marketing strategies to the companies that produce the products. Both groups came up with very creative ideas as well as great advertising spots. So put your hands together for the great turnout and thanks again for coming from all over the country!

The students as well as the LSS staff and all our passionate organizers had a lot of fun last weekend and enjoyed their time with the visitors.

And who knows…maybe someday we will get products such as Halloren and Manner in Britain! 🙂

Julia

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The German students with our two Aston student ambassadors Hannah and Morgan.

An advert created for the marketing campaign for Manner wafers. Yum!

 

Julia

Award for staff publication: “Constructing a German Diaspora”

Aston Reader in German Dr Stefan Manz’s book on German emigration has been named a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2015. The book has been reviewed in a number of highly regarded academic journals as being ‘a very significant contribution to the field of breathtaking scope’, ‘essential’, ‘a model of historical scholarship’, ‘pioneering’, ‘innovative’, ‘unique’, ‘fascinating’, and ‘important.

From the publisher:

“This book takes on a global perspective to unravel the complex relationship between Imperial Germany and its diaspora. Around 1900, German-speakers living abroad were tied into global power-political aspirations. They were represented as outposts of a “Greater German Empire” whose ethnic links had to be preserved for their own and the fatherland’s benefits. Did these ideas fall on fertile ground abroad? In the light of extreme social, political, and religious heterogeneity, diaspora construction did not redeem the all-encompassing fantasies of its engineers. But it certainly was at work, as nationalism “went global” in many German ethnic communities. Three thematic areas are taken as examples to illustrate the emergence of globally operating organizations and communication flows: Politics and the navy issue, Protestantism, and German schools abroad as “bulwarks of language preservation.” The public negotiation of these issues is explored for localities as diverse as Shanghai, Cape Town, Blumenau in Brazil, Melbourne, Glasgow, the Upper Midwest in the United States, and the Volga Basin in Russia. The mobilisation of ethno-national diasporas is also a feature of modern-day globalization. The theoretical ramifications analysed in the book are as poignant today as they were for the nineteenth century.”

New: German food without the umlaut

A few weeks ago, we came across a curious storefront in the Birmingham city centre: German Doner Kebab offers what has long been one of the most traditional “buy at midnight on the way home from the bar” meals in many German cities, and it does a very good job of replicating that quintessentially German culinary experience of the Döner: toasted flatbread, a crispy mix of salad and onions, a tasty garlic sauce and well-seasoned meat – beef or chicken, or a mix of both. They’ve dropped the Umlaut, but they get the food right – and even promise that Börek and Kartoffelsalat are “coming soon”. The fresh ingredients and authentic taste come at a price, but if you want a genuine taste of a German classic, give it a try!

German Doner Kebab
84 Bull Street

German Doner Kebab 1 German Doner Kebab 2 German Doner Kebab 4German Doner Kebab 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rauriser Literaturpreis 2016 awarded to Hanna Sukare

Our literary expert Uwe Schütte was a member of the jury who awarded this year’s Rauris Prize for Literature to Hanna Sukare. The award recognises the best German-language prose debut of the year. Not strictly speaking a young debutante, Sukare is 59 years old and lives in Vienna. Her excellent novel Staubzunge was published by Otto Müller in Salzburg.

 

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Rauris is a small alpine town in the Salzburg region of Austria. It is famous for its annual literary festival which will take place this year from 30 March to 3 April. Find out more about the event here.

 

 

 

 

Kölle Alaaf!

 

Karnevalstermine-Köln-2016

 

The carnival in Cologne is not only one of the biggest but also one of the most amusing festivals in Germany. People are about to celebrate the end of the carnival season which starts in November and furthermore herald the Christian season of Lent. From “Weiberfastnacht”, the Thursday before Shrove Monday, until “Shrove Tuesday” there is a proven period of sessions, balls and parades, and it is celebrated, sung and danced mainly in the halls, restaurants and pubs. People from all over the world unite to  join the processions and try to catch the sweets. The local beer “Kölsch” flows like water and every year cologne provides another theme to entertain the carnival revellers.

Popular song from a local band:

Jule